Spro Cave (Spro Gruve) – “Diamond” Mine Near Oslo

Spro cave or Spro mine (“Spro gruve” in Norwegian) is one of these places that you wouldn’t expect to find near Oslo. But here it is! The abandoned mine and a cave that shimmers in the sun, with a “diamond beach” and peaceful surroundings. All that makes Spro cave a great place to visit, a short way from Norway’s capital.

Spro cave gruve Oslo

Last year, I’ve spent a lot of time discovering Norway and the areas near Oslo. That’s how stumbled upon Spro cave. You can check all of my findings in a post 27 day trips from Oslo.

Spro cave, or Spro gruve (which means “mine” in Norwegian) is, in fact, an abandoned mine. As a geologist, I was even more interested in it, since, muscovite, a shiny mineral, can be found there. This is what makes the whole inside of the cave shimmering in the sun. It’s also spread around the beach outside, called, because of that, a “Diamond Beach”.


Read more: 27 ideas for Oslo Day Trips


 

Spro cave 

Spro mine was, most likely, created in the 1880s. It was mainly active in a period from 1904 to 1918. Apart from muscovite, you could find there other minerals such as quartz, euxenite, monazite, beryl, tourmaline, topaz, apatite, calcite, and fluorite. 

Spro cave inside

To get to the inside of the Spro cave, you need to walk through a narrow passage, that leads to an open chamber. The cave ceiling collapsed some time ago, so now there is a huge hole in the roof. Thanks to that, the light can penetrate inside of the cave and make muscovite shine in the sun. 

The roof collapse placed some massive boulders on the ground. This makes it a bit difficult to navigate around the cave. The boulders can get quite slippery when wet, and when you touch them, then your hands will be covered with glitter from muscovite. 

The main hall, with a lake in it, it’s the biggest attraction. But there is also a smaller part of the cave, in the back. It’s tighter and darker. There used to be a wooden coffin there (not sure why?!), but it wasn’t there when I was visiting.

Entrance to Spro cave, near Oslo
Entrance to Spro cave, near Oslo
Inside Spro cave, near Oslo
Inside Spro cave, near Oslo

Read more: Where to stay in Oslo – best Oslo hotels on every budget + Oslo districts explained


Outside of Spro cave and Diamond Beach

Outside the cave, you can find many nice swimming and fishing spots. On a bright day, make sure to check out the “Diamond Beach” and see how it glitters in the sun. From the shore, you can also admire the views of Oslo

The area is very popular with local families and there is plenty of space to pitch a tent or place a hammock. 

Practical information for Spro Gruve

Spro cave is quite a popular place for locals. If you decide to visit it during the weekend, expect it to be busy. In the area around the cave, there are plenty of great spots for a picnic, bonfire, or camping.

Take non-slippery boots and a headlamp, especially if you want to explore the darker parts of the cave. 

Entering the cave is at your own risk. There is always a small possibility of rockfall or injury, so be careful.

Spro Cave in Oslo – Spro Gruve Location

Spro cave is located in Nesoddtangen peninsula, which is just a short trip from Oslo. 

How to get to Spro cave by public transport:

Take a ferry from Aker Brygge to Nesoddtangen. It takes only 25 minutes, and you can use your normal bus/T-bane ticket on it.  Then you can take bus 575 to Nodre Spro. From there, walk to the cave.

How to get to Spro gruve by public transport. Map data 2021 Norway, Google Maps

How to get to Spro cave by car:

From Oslo, take E18 in the direction of Stockholm. In Vinterbro, turn into a smaller road, that leads to Nesoddtangen peninsula. Head towards small town Spro. Park the car in the available car park (depends on which side you want to approach the cave from) and walk to the cave. 

How to get to Spro gruve by driving. Map data 2021 Norway, Google Maps

How to reach the cave:

There are several ways of getting to the cave. The main path used to be from the Nordre Spro pier in the south, going 1 km north to the cave. When I was visiting in 2020, this area was blocked due to the construction site. We went to the cave from the other side and walked by the shore starting from the north towards the south.

Read more about Norway:

Where to stay in Oslo – best Oslo hotels on every budget + Oslo districts explained

27 Most Interesting Day Trips From Oslo

The best things to do in Oslo in winter

Rjukan ice climbing and other things to do from a day trip from Oslo 

Norway on a budget – locals’ tips for cheap travel in Norway 

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